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Re: Best place to buy Adobe LightRoom standalone?

PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 10:33 am
by K30
LennyBloke wrote:
Smeggypants wrote:
Gravelrash wrote:Sounds good. I'd love to put my desktop C: Drive on an SSD but I don't have the skills to perfectly mirror the operating system. Whenever I've tried before I always end up losing something important.

It should make for a big performance boost though. Let us know how you get on :)



I've never use a HDD for OS again. Why mirror it? Just start again with a fresh install. It's a good way to clear out a lot of crap that's built up. if you forget something you can always connect the old OS HDD again and copy the data to d: drive before reattaching the SSD again



I'm intending to use an SSD for OS and programs and editing area - and attach external storage for, well, storage.

I'm going to use the Microsoft Windows Media Creation tool (https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/softwar ... ndows10ISO) to make a bootable Windows 10 on a USB stick I can then swap the HDD for an SSD, boot from the USB stick and install a fresh copy of Windows 10 on the SSD (without all the "bloatware" that comes with most new computers).

I just need to find a good, reasonably priced SSD (around 500Gb-ish should do). I've missed out on a couple of deals in the last couple of weeks but I'm sure they'll come around again :thumb:



Once you've had an SSD its unlikely you'll want to go to a HDD again. The Samsung 850 EVO is generally at the top of the non-pro SATA pile of offerings. That said having used Crucial and Sandisk as well as being an earlier adopter of the OCZ drives when they first came out its unlikely you'll be disappointed. I would stay away from non mainstream options though.

Anantech bench do a useful comparison tool for SSD amongst other components:

http://www.anandtech.com/bench/SSD15/1186

You will only get the true benefit from SSD if have a mobo that supports SATA III, actually my main rig doesn't but I still feel SSD is worthwhile. You can find out if your board supports it by installing Sandra Lite:

http://filehippo.com/download_sandra_lite/

With installation in 7 onwards you no longer have to worry about partition alignment, just run the install as normal. One thing I have found helpful over the years is that whilst OS installation is now reasonably easy and faster with SSD the time taken to configure your system with all progs email clients etc loaded and point the user areas (docs, pictures etc) to another drive not to mention OS and security updates does take time, probably the best part of a day for me and I do them regularly.

What can help is getting your OS and programmes to a basic configuration then cloning the SSD to an old HDD, that way you save yourslef the ball ache of doing all that again if you need to reload your OS. Just make sure you use a clone tool like Acronis that replicates alignment as you don't want to be adjusting it afterward.

Cheers

Best place to buy Adobe LightRoom standalone?

PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 1:42 pm
by LennyBloke
Appreciate all the additional info - :cheers:

Re: Best place to buy Adobe LightRoom standalone?

PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 1:27 am
by Smeggypants
K30 wrote:You will only get the true benefit from SSD if have a mobo that supports SATA III



They are much faster on SATAII Slots as well.

Re: Best place to buy Adobe LightRoom standalone?

PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 11:20 am
by K30
Smeggypants wrote:
K30 wrote:You will only get the true benefit from SSD if have a mobo that supports SATA III



They are much faster on SATAII Slots as well.



Agreed,

You will only get the true benefit from SSD if have a mobo that supports SATA III, actually my main rig doesn't but I still feel SSD is worthwhile.

Missed the second part?

:)

Best place to buy Adobe LightRoom standalone?

PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 1:48 pm
by LennyBloke
Just to say I finally got round to ordering a 525Gb Crucial MX300 SSD that arrived yesterday, dismantling the laptop to swap the drives was nerve racking - it doesn't have those nice sections to unscrew and access the RAM, HDD, etc. I had to remove the whole base section, prying the keyboard and base apart with a "plastic pry tool" (like we've all got one of those lying around) - the closest thing I could find was a white plastic disposable picnic knife which snapped at least 3 times, eventually I found how much force was acceptable in pulling the base away and then it was a doddle.

The install of Windows 10 using the Microsoft Media Creator tool on a USB stick was quick and easy, and I now have a decent spec laptop with a good size screen and with no "bloatware". I haven't installed a photo editing program as yet (still deciding between LR and On1 PhotoRaw) but basic operations are noticeably quicker than before.

I can't say I enjoyed the whole experience but I know it'll be worthwhile. :thumb: